Hit the Woods

Squirrel Season Is Back!

Buck Buchanan (pictured above) and Max Rowe of Just Kill’n Time have are getting it done this squirrel season with airguns from Benjamin!

Buck filled his bag using the Marauder Pistol (above), taking both at 25 yards. A few weeks ago, Max got his stew meat with a Trail NP All Weather (.22) and sent us this video.

Have you gone beyond the backyard with your Benjamin this season? Let us know in the comments!

Watch Just Kill’n Time on Pursuit Channel.

Follow Buck & Max on JKT’s Facebook page and Twitter.

Squirrel Hunting With Max Rowe

Television personality Max Rowe of Just Killin’ Time recently took a Benjamin Trail NP All Weather .22 caliber rifle to the woods for his first crack at squirrel hunting with an airgun.  The tough part will be getting him out of the woods…..

You can catch Max and co-host Buck Buchanan on Pursuit Channel.

Up Your Game With A Treestand

This is a guest post from our friends at HunterTreeStands.com.

People have been using air guns to hunt small game for many years and will continue to do so as long as companies continue to release great new guns. Hunting with air guns requires a good bit of strategy and planning if you want to have a successful day, and hunters all around the world continue to come up with new ideas that step their game up to the next level. Using hunting tree stands are one of the most recently growing trends and tools found in many air gun hunters arsenals.

The highly raved about Benjamin Marauder Woods Walker air pistol, also known as the Treestand Companion, is a perfect match to use with many types of tree stands. The Marauder features a 700 FPS velocity for .22 caliber ammunition in a compact bolt action air pistol that only weighs 2.7 pounds. This gun is specifically engineered to carry enough power for stopping many small game animals while remaining compact and camouflaged enough for you to not be easily spotted.

So how exactly can a tree stand help air gun hunters be more successful in the woods? Throughout the rest of this article I’m going to explain some of the great strategies you can implement that will help ensure that you can get close enough to the target to land a perfect kill shot. The most important part of hunting with a rifle, air gun, bow or any other weapon is being able to land that kill shot. If you’re unable to accurately place your shot, then it doesn’t matter what ammunition or weapon you’re using, you will most likely lose the animal you’re trying to put down.

How exactly can a hunting tree stand help you get closer to your target to successfully land that shot? Well you may have not thought about this before, but the main reason why hunting tree stands are being used by thousands of hunters today, is because they work! They work by allowing patient hunters to get extremely close to deer or smaller game and permitting the optimum amount of effectiveness possible. Distance is your rival when it comes to landing a precise shot, because if you were only a few feet away from your target, then a bull’s eye shot would be effortless. When you’re trying to hunt from ground level, you will have a lesser chance of any animal stumbling within the range of your weapon, and therefore your chances of success are slightly weakened.

The Marauder Woods Walker air pistol is an amazing gun that definitely has the ability to put many small game animals down quickly and accurately. But along with a hunter tree stands, you will be able to take your hunting game to the next level and ensure that you have many more opportunities to get close enough to make those necessary shots.

People have been using air guns to hunt small game for many years and will continue to do so as long as companies continue to release great new guns. Hunting with air guns requires a good bit of strategy and planning if you want to have a successful day, and hunters all around the world continue to come up with new ideas that step their game up to the next level. Using hunting tree stands are one of the most recently growing trends and tools found in many air gun hunters arsenals.The highly raved about Marauder Woods Walker air pistol, also known as the Treestand Companion, is a perfect match to use with many types of tree stands. The Marauder features a 700 FPS velocity for .22 caliber ammunition in a compact bolt action air pistol that only weighs 2.7 pounds. This gun is specifically engineered to carry enough power for stopping many small game animals while remaining compact and camouflaged enough for you to not be easily spotted.So how exactly can a tree stand help air gun hunters be more successful in the woods? Throughout the rest of this article I’m going to explain some of the great strategies you can implement that will help ensure that you can get close enough to the target to land a perfect kill shot. The most important part of hunting with a rifle, air gun, bow or any other weapon is being able to land that kill shot. If you’re unable to accurately place your shot, then it doesn’t matter what ammunition or weapon you’re using, you will most likely lose the animal you’re trying to put down.

How exactly can a hunting tree stand help you get closer to your target to successfully land that shot? Well you may have not thought about this before, but the main reason why hunting tree stands are being used by thousands of hunters today, is because they work! They work by allowing patient hunters to get extremely close to deer or smaller game and permitting the optimum amount of effectiveness possible. Distance is your rival when it comes to landing a precise shot, because if you were only a few feet away from your target, then a bull’s eye shot would be effortless. When you’re trying to hunt from ground level, you will have a lesser chance of any animal stumbling within the range of your weapon, and therefore your chances of success are slightly weakened.

The Marauder Woods Walker air pistol is an amazing gun that definitely has the ability to put many small game animals down quickly and accurately. But along with a hunter tree stands, you will be able to take your hunting game to the next level and ensure that you have many more opportunities to get close enough to make those necessary shots.

Check out the Treestand Companion ProPick for a complete package treestand hunting package!

Woods Walker Review By J. Wayne Fears

J. Wayne Fears makes a bold claim in his column for Great Days Outdoors magazine: “I plan on opening up the squirrel season using this unique gun to get my stew meat.” The gun is the Marauder Woods Walker from Benjamin Airguns. For a respected author on firearms, that may come as a surprise to some.

Fears goes on to explain the benefits of the Woods Walker in the two-page piece that you can read in its entireity below. Dime-sized shots at 15 yards, inch at 50. An 8-round magazine. Quiet. Loads of energy for small game and pests. “This is an excellent gun to keep in the farm truck….or other outings” writes Fears.

Benjamin Marauder Woods Walker

Treestand Companion ProPick

Blackbuck With The Benjamin Rogue

Ian Harford is back in Texas with the Benjamin Rogue .357 air rifle after an elusive Blackbuck. An experienced hunter with big bore airguns, our prostaffer shows a lot of patience pursuing then closing the distance to get his shot.

Photos Or It Didn’t Happen

When Grant Woods, Wildlife Biologist and host of GrowingDeer.tv emailed the note, “one of my employees killed a groundhog with the Woods Walker today!”, we just had to have proof.  That’s part of the deal, right? Send a photo or it didn’t happen.

Well Grant didn’t let us down. Growing deer is serious business and when this critter was spotted he didn’t want to spook any deer that may be nearby. Grant adds, “Groundhogs have been significantly impacting the soybeans in our food plots. The quiet Benjamin Marauder Woods Walker was the perfect solution for this soybean muncher!”

Have your own Benjamin story to tell? We want to hear it. Oh, and send a photo or it didn’t happen!

Tony Martins And Arizona Prairie Dogs

Tony Martins is an airgun authority and outdoor writer based in Arizona. He was instrumental in obtaining stateapproval for more hunting opportunities for airgunners in that state. This season, .35 caliber PCP airguns and larger are legal for more large game than any other state in the country, including bear, mountain lion, bighorn sheep, javelina, antelope and mule deer. PCP airguns of .25 caliber and larger are approved for predatory and furbearing animals.

Instead of Easter Bunnies we hunted prairie dogs (Gunnison’s variety) Easter Sunday afternoon in Eastern Arizona. Despite very windy conditions requiring as much as two inches of windage compensation, I was able to connect on 5 out of 9 shots from 33 to 58 yards with a .25 caliber Marauder on the final day of the early season. The pinpoint accuracy and quietness of the Marauder enabled me to take the pair in the photo above from the same hole. Remarkably, the second dog remained in full view even after its mate was dropped!  These are tough little animals, but a well placed Benjamin “Destroyer” pellet takes them down quickly.

Hunting prairie dogs with an airgun requires patience… and kneepads are recommended!  I typically crawl into range of a hole that one or more dogs have disappeared into, check the distance, adjust the scope and wait for them to reappear – which may take 20 minutes or more. I use a bipod for sitting shots when bushes or rocks are available for cover, and remove the bipod for prone shots when laying out in the open.  If you want to add even more challenge, drag along a video camera on a short tripod to record your hits… and misses!

Below are several frames from one of my videos showing a prairie dog taken with the Marauder .25 at 92 yards. The pellet in flight is circled in red. The scope was zeroed at 40 yards, so I allowed about five inches for elevation and the pellet actually dropped about 5.5 inches to hit him in the throat. It takes a remarkable gun to make a remarkable shot! By the way, I now zero the scope at 50 yards when I will be hunting prairie dogs.

Hoggin’ With Harford

Prostaffer Ian Harford and Team Wild take the 2013 Redneck Tour down South for hogs at Alabama’s Enon Plantation. His tool: the Benjamin Rogue .357 big bore air rifle.

Rogue Puts Mutton On The Menu

Benjamin Prostaffer Ian Harford brings the big gun to cull a pesky Jacob’s Ram in Texas.

Predator Hunting Tips

Rick Ward has hunted predators for thirty years. It wasn’t until he relocated to an urban area did he consider airguns for pursuing them. “Like most hunters I grew up with an airgun. I took small game asa youngster with several Crosman products,” said Ward. When he moved to Georgia he could heard the coyotes at night but knew his traditional firearm was not an option due to noise and safety concerns. “I met Benjamin Prostaffer Barry Stewart and he introduced me to adult hunting air rifles. After visiting with him several times I chose the Benjamin Marauder .25 caliber PCP rifle,” recaps Ward.

Rick took a few days to sight in and become comfortable with the Marauder. Then he took it beyond the backyard. “I went rabbit hunting to see how it performed on small game. The accuracy and hard hitting impact was well beyond my expectations.”

The rise in ammunition prices, coupled with the cost of fuel to travel to hunting areas well outside his local township, have contributed to the satisfaction of owning a Benjamin air rifle. “I can drive my electric golf cart to a small farm that I have gained access to and because the Marauder is so quiet, my stands are just a few hundred yards apart,” he explains. On one of his first outings with the Marauder, Rick bagged a raccoon and then the golden ticket: a coyote at fifty yards. “I am very impressed with the Marauder .25 and believe it is affordable for most any hunter’s budget,” Ward concluded.

After visiting with Rick we asked him to go into detail about coyote hunting with airguns.

Benjamin: What’s your loadout – calls,decoys, guns, ammunition, gear?
Rick Ward: I use both types of calls: hand calls and I use an electronic call with a remote . This allows me to get the call out away from me and if the e-call malfunctions I would still be able to hunt.

Decoys: I love decoys because in most cases they help hold the animal’s attention, making them a very useful tool when predator hunting. I really like the MOJO Outdoors products they seem to have the best battery life and they operate quieter than others I have used.

Guns: I shoot the Benjamin Marauder in. .25 caliber. It is just the ticket for small game and I have even taken fox and coyotes with well-placed headshots. The Benjamin 27.8 grain pellet seems to work best in the gun. It is a hard hitting pellet for whatever you hunt.

Gear: I have a backpack and it holds everything: my e-call, lights, extra batteries, you name it, it’s in there plus bottled water and snacks. Because I will walk into a lot of places and may cover a couple of miles so it has lot of stuff in it.

Benjamin: What’s your call sequence? What call do you use first, follow up with if it doesn’t work, and what’s your go-to call?
Rick Ward: Wow that is a tough question. Several factors come into play. What time of year is it? Has the property been called before? With an electronic call their are hundreds of sounds that can be downloaded. When selecting the sounds you need to keep in mind that there are three categories: Prey Distress, Canine Distress and Coyote Vocalizations. When selecting a sound to play you need to keep in mind the four triggers: Hunger, Curiosity, Territorial and Parental. Some people play a dieing rabbit sound over and over and on every stand, so much so that the coyotes know the call by name.

Instead, take a moment and think about what you are going to do before you go out. I like to start off with a low mouse squeak or a kitten distress. More times than not a coyote will see you come in. I like to use a jack rabbit distress or snowshoe hare. These work most of the time. But what if the predator is not hungry?  I can sometimes trigger a curiosity or parental response with coyote or canine sounds. My go-to sound would be puppies.  This will trigger a natural maternal instinct and they will usually come in to see what’s going on. I could do a whole other Q&A on calling predators so I will stop now that I have you scratching your head.

Benjamin: What do you consider the effective range for your Marauder?
Rick Ward: For me, because I hunt mainly predators, I have my gun dead-on at 50 yards. I have taken rabbits at 65 – 75 yards. I am thinking that I read that the air gun guru Jim Chapman has taken prairie dogs at over a 100 yards with his Marauder. I know that the gun is very capable but it is up to the skills of the shooter. “Practice Practice and Practice some more” I believe that you get out of it what you put into it.

Benjamin: Safety tips for urban hunting?
Rick Ward: Always know your surroundings. Scout your hunting grounds and know what is beyond what you are shooting at. And last but not least handle your air rifle as you would any firearm because it can be just as deadly.

Benjamin: Suggestions on gaining access to property?
Rick Ward: If you want to gain access to land be humble and when you go to meet with landowners dress nice; don’t show up in camo with a two-day shadow. Let the landowner know that you have seen coyote activity in or around his property while passing by. And then listen to what he has to say. Don’t throw up all over him about all you know. Just listen. For example a couple of weeks ago I finally got the courage to stop and ask about  some property that I have been driving past for several years. I stopped and introduced myself to him and said I have seen several coyote crossing the road and wandering around that field across the road from you and was wondering if you could tell me who owns the property.

“Well I own it this is four hundred acres and I have seen several coyotes out there.”

I am an avoid coyote hunter.

“Well we don’t let people hunt or shoot on our property.”

I understand. I hunt with an airgun that shoots a .25 caliber pellet. “Really?” he said. Yes sir.I am very respectful of the properties that I am on and safety always comes first.

“We do have a lot of coyotes and I need to do something about them.”

He gave me his number and told me to call him the next day. As I thanked him for his time and turned to leave, a coyote ran across the field. I looked back at him and said thanks again.  I called him back the next day and he said that as long as I called him before I come over I could give it a try. I have killed two coyotes off of his place. He has now given me keys to the gates and revealed that he had another 160 acres has seen coyotes on that property.  Can I  hunt that place also I asked? Well ya he said with a chuckle.  This has lead me to an additional 400 acres by the landowner next to the 160. Sometimes no does not mean no not ever. It just means no not now.I have over twenty thousand acres to hunt predators within thirty minutes of my home.

Be humble, quick to listen and slow to speak and you will go a long way.

Happy Hunting.

Fred Eichler Takes An Airgun To Kansas

Fred Eichler was in Kansas in December 2012 hunting coyotes for Predator Nation and brought along the Benjamin Rogue .357 air rifle.

Catch Predator Nation on the Sportsman Channel Tuesday’s @ 10:30am, Thursday’s @ 9:30pm and Friday’s @ 12:30am.

Notice no magazine in the Rogue? Fred was using low scope mounts and it wouldn’t fit. He had just one round of the Nosler 145 grain ballistic tip air bullets and that’s all it took.

Texas Safari With Ian Harford

The old saying, “there’s no grass under his feet”, is an apt description of Ian Harford. The latest member of the Benjamin Prostaff and the man behind Team Wild TV planned to make the most of his recent time in the U.S. and when the dust settled, the ground under his feet was tamped to a fine powder from visiting two of the largest outdoor industry tradeshows and completing a couple years’ worth of hunts in just a few days.

With a trip to the Archery Trade Association (ATA) show and the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Tradeshow (S.H.O.T. Show) scheduled, Ian opted to travel to the States early for some Texas hog hunting with specialist Joshua White of L3 Outdoors. Ian wrapped up his time with several hunts for exotic species with fellow prostaffer Terry Tate in Texas. By the end of the week Ian had etched new notches with the Rogue by taking:

  • Barbado Sheep
  • Blackbuck
  • Armadillo
  • 3-Horn Jacobs Ram
  • 4-Horn Jacobs Ram
  • Blonde Corsican Ram
  • Black Hawaiian Ram
  • Catalina Goat
  • 2 x Corsican Ram
  • Trophy Texas Dall Ram
  • Axis Deer Doe

Team Wild will be making the videos of these hunts available all year long. In the meantime, follow Ian on Twitter to keep up with his latest airgun exploits.

Ian Harford Preps The Rogue For Texas

Benjamin Prostaffer Ian Harford unboxes a new Rogue .357 and sights in in anticipation of a Texas boar hunt. Follow Ian on Twitter and Team Wild on Facebook and YouTube as the action unfolds in January.

Monster Rabbits With The Rogue .357

Join Ian Harford in Africa as he pursues giant rabbits on a farm with Nduna Hunting Safaris. Along the way he’ll get an opportunity on an elusive Genet.

Head Cam Footage Of A Rogue Hunt

Prostaffer Ian Harford takes you on the hunt for a Red Hartebeest in Africa with the Benjamin Rogue .357 air rifle. Ian, his guide and cameraman close the distance by crawling out of sight of the animal, then taking the shot at 52 yards.

Hit the Woods